Poster art


MARTIN SHARP.

MARTIN SHARP.

Litho on gold foilboard, 500x740mm. Signed editions 001 to 096 of 250. Stamped editions: 097 to 250. Probably one of the foremost images of the Sixties psychedelic poster explosion and one of Sharp's greatest icons. Also known as "Mr Tambourine Man", it evokes a sense of everything creative that was to come from that era. Sharp was a great admirer of Bob Dylan's, watching him three times on his last tour of Australia, even presenting Dylan with his last original copy of this poster.

This heavily psychedelic image was created in 1967 while Sharp was living in London and working as an illustrator for the underground magazine Oz, one of the most visually exciting publications of its time. Sharp also designed posters for Donovan, Cream and Jimi Hendrix. This complex, multi-stencil design was printed on gold foil paper. Sharp has related "Mr Tambourine Man" and other images from this period to his experience visiting the ancient Cambodian temple complex of Angkor in 1966.

554 Euros plus shipping. You may order this poster emailing us at info@wallofsoundgallery.com.

MARTIN SHARP.

MARTIN SHARP.

Litho on silver foilboard, 500x740mm. Signed edition of 250. Among the plethora of musicians of note in the 60's, Donovan, the English folk singer, was among those who Martin Sharp took inspiration and enjoyed an artistic empathy with. In dedicating this artwork to him he captures the essence of Donovan's music and angelic view of the world.

As a companion piece to the more famous Bob Dylan "Mr Tambourine Man" (or "Blowing in the Mind"), this poster was released when London was very much the epicentre of the so-called Swinging Sixties. Upon his arrival in the United Kingdom from Australia, Sharp became an active participant in the scene that was leading a cultural and social revolution. He founded the London Oz magazine with Richard Neville and produced posters for Big O Posters with Peter Ledeboer using various printing techniques such as lithography, silkscreening and offset lithography though Sharp would later experiment with mylar printing and painting on glass.

554 Euros plus shipping. You may order this poster emailing us at info@wallofsoundgallery.com.

RICHARD AVEDON. THE BEATLES.

RICHARD AVEDON. THE BEATLES.

In 1965 legendary American photographer Richard Avedon was in London researching an assignment for the magazine "Harper's Bazaar" and had met the Beatles at the Ad Lib club. He got to photograph the band and some photos appeared in the "Daily Mail". On August 11, 1967, he had a second opportunity to shoot the Beatles at a photographic studio in a penthouse in Thompson House, 200 Gray's Inn Road, London. He took a number of images of the group, four of which were later adorned with psychedelic effects. They were first published in the January 9, 1968, edition of the US magazine "Look", and were subsequently sold as posters. In the UK they first appeared in the "Daily Express" newspaper, in February 1968, and in Germany in “Stern” magazine. Readers were given the chance to buy enlargements of the set, along with a special Beatles poster. Avedon's portraits later appeared on the 1977 Beatles compilation Love Songs, and on their 2000 hits album 1. John Lennon’s psychedelic portrait was used as the cover shot of the book Avedon. The Sixties. The set of four individual posters usually comes with a fifth poster with a straight B/W group image.

Full set 700 Euros plus shipping. You may order these posters emailing us at info@wallofsoundgallery.com.

MILTON GLASER. BOB DYLAN.

MILTON GLASER. BOB DYLAN.

Rock music in the Sixties inspired a particular genre of poster art in America. The most iconic poster of all, according to Gail Davidson of the National Design Museum in New York City "a key item in any poster collection", is Milton Glaser’s 1966 image of  Bob Dylan. Glaser, who received a National Medal of Arts at a White House ceremony in February 2014, was just beginning his extraordinary career as an artist and graphic designer. John Berg, then art director at Columbia Records, asked him to create a poster to be folded and packaged into Dylan’s Greatest Hits LP. “This was probably my third or fourth poster,” Glaser recalls. It would become one of the most widely circulated of all time; six million or more were distributed with the enormously popular album.

A psychedelic Dylan, but Glaser always said he took his inspiration for the Dylan profile from a 1957 self-portrait by Marcel Duchamp with a touch of Art Nouveau in Glaser's invented typeface for the single word “Dylan”. The insertion of the name "Elvis" in Dylan's kaleidoscopic hair remains an enigma to this very day. 

100 Euros including original vinyl album, plus shipping. You may order this poster emailing us at info@wallofsoundgallery.com.  

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